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Presentations Day 2

Presentations Day 2

Disruptors or delegates? Deputy Director - Generals Panel

Facilitated by Melissa Fox, CEO, Health Consumers Queensland

  • Barbara Phillips, Deputy Director-General, Corporate Services, Queensland Health
  • Nick Steele, Deputy Director-General, Healthcare Purchasing and System Performance, Queensland Health
  • Dr John Wakefield, Deputy Director-General, Clinical Excellence Queensland, Queensland Health

Senior public servants are responsible for implementing government policy of the day. Their roles provide great opportunities to champion the vital ongoing role of consumers in ensuring it’s implementation, monitoring and evaluation meets communities’ needs. Three of Queensland’s Deputy Director-Generals will be put under the spotlight as we challenge them to describe how consumers will be central in them delivering on their 3-5 year legacy in their roles.

 


Presentations Day 2

Consumer champions

challenge the system to “choose wisely”

  • Jessica Toleman, A/Executive Director, Women’s and Newborn Services, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital
  • Lee-Ann Monks, consumer representative, Choosing Wisely Shared Decision Making in ED Project, Sunshine Coast Hospital & Health Service

Choosing Wisely Australia is a campaign that enables clinicians, consumers and healthcare stakeholders to start important conversations about tests, treatments and procedures where evidence shows they provide no benefit, or in some cases, lead to harm. Hear about consumers and clinicians experiences of embedding Choosing Wisely in their health service. And learn how you can become a champion for Choosing Wisely in your health service!

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Presentations Day 2

Behind the Wire Engagement

  • Anne Curtis, Engagement Consultant – Specific Projects, Health Consumers Queensland
  • Denise Sticklen, Nurse Unit Manager, Townsville Correctional Centre
  • Joanne Sherring, Patient Centred Care Lead, Townsville Hospital and Health Service

Each day, the Townsville Hospital and Health Service’s Prison Health staff provide health care and treatment to a patient group with complex needs and a high prevalence of mental health conditions, communicable diseases, illicit drug use, poor oral health, and chronic disease when compared to the general population. These consumers are totally dependent on corrections officers to access health care. Last year we listened to prisoners across Queensland about their solutions which would improve their access to health care. This informed the content of a co-designed training workshop for Queensland Health staff and Queensland Corrective Services staff working within Queensland Correctional Centres, which is leading to opportunities to reduce existing barriers to effective service provision and improve and enhance delivery of patient-centred care.

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Presentations Day 2

Leading the Way

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Leaders

Facilitator: Louise Lawrie, Consumer member of the Queensland Health Consumers Collaborative (statewide group) and the Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Consumer Consultative Committee.

  • Joy Savage, Executive Director, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service
  • Venessa Curnow, Executive Director, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, Torres and Cape Hospital and Health Service
  • Dallas Leon, Executive Director, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, Townsville Hospital and Health Service

The health experiences and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities across Queensland are significant. Most importantly, much of the work on integrating health care services and strengthening the health of people and communities is being led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders. This panel discussion is a chance to meet some of these leaders and learn what their priorities are, the importance of working with community on meeting these priorities and some of their success stories. These are relatively new roles – strategically influencing decision-making at a high level to ensure the cultural, emotional, social and health needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are at the forefront of decisions and policy.

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Presentations Day 2

How did I get here

The story of a consumer's journeyfrom concerned parent to a consumer advisor

Wide Bay Hospital and Health Service

  • Lyn Nichols, Cultural Capability Program Coordinator
  • Gary Hondow, Consumer Representative

Up until the age of 14 months, Gary and his wife Sharmaine had a relatively typical child. It was then that they noticed things were not quite right, and after multiple tests and years of waiting for a diagnosis, found themselves parents of a child with a rare, complex medical condition. This forced them into a world of healthcare they had never envisaged being a part of. Gary’s story will tell how he began as a farm worker searching for answers, advocating for better care and services for his son, to becoming a consumer who has sat on State-wide committees such as the Patient Travel Subsidy Scheme (PTSS) steering committee, Queensland Genomics and HCQ Consumer Advisory Group as well as numerous service improvement groups at Queensland Children’s Hospital. He was named Volunteer of the Year 2018 for Wide Bay Hospital and Health Service. Gary is still a farm worker, now advocating not only for his son, but for all consumers using the health care system.

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Presentations Day 2

Advancing Kidney Care 2026 (AKC2026)

A Queensland collaborative supporting improved kidney health care and patient outcomes

Queensland Health

  • Anne Cameron, Clinical Nurse Consultant, AKC2026 Collaborative
  • Martin Chambers, Consumer Representative, AKC2026 Collaborative

One in three adult Australians are at risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and one in ten have signs of CKD. This equates to 500,000 Queenslanders. CKD can lead to end stage kidney disease, which has two outcomes: death or the need for dialysis or kidney transplantation. At the end of 2017, there were 5,156 Queenslanders on these treatments. In 2018, Queensland Health established the Advancing Kidney Care 2026 (AKC2026) Collaborative to support improvement in kidney health and in the provision of kidney health services within the public sector. AKC2026 is comprised of consumers, clinicians, Department of Health executives, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health practitioners and other representatives from primary care. AKC2026 currently has three workstreams (clinical, funding and information systems), which are working together to develop foundational resources to support a consistent and equitable state-wide approach towards patient-centric delivery of kidney care, now and into the future.

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Presentations Day 2

How a consumer advocate connected to innovate change

Children’s Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service

  • Claire Reilly, Paediatric Dietitian, Children’s Health Queensland
  • Keren Pointon, Consumer Representative

The Queensland Children’s Hospital Interdisciplinary Feeding Team often provides care to children requiring weans from temporary feeding tubes that have been in for extended periods of time (i.e., greater than 12 months). This is despite resolution of the original reason for the tube’s insertion. This was the experience of Keren Pointon and her daughter, who advocated for innovation and transformation of current management practices through the establishment of the Temporary Tube Feeding Management Project.

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Presentations Day 2

It’s all about community!

Cairns Community Health, Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service

  • Simon Doyle-Adams, Clinical Nurse Consultant, Team Leader
  • Kathy Clark, Cairns Hepatitis Action Team (CHAT)
  • Andrea Mills, Peer Educator
  • Max Mackenzie, Mental Health Social Worker

The Cairns Sexual Health Service delivers quality sexual health services that are based on the principles of equity, inclusion, compassion, confidentiality and an overall respect for human rights. We will do this by: being responsive and innovative in our planning and provision of services to those with greatest need; working together with our clients, and the communities they come from, in partnership to improve sexual and reproductive health outcomes; and embracing research and evidenced-based practice within our service provision. While the clinic is open to everyone, our core client groups are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, sex workers, men who have sex with men, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex people, people who inject drugs and young people. Peer workers play an important role in our community development work and co-design programs we deliver.

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Presentations Day 2

Forging health literacy partnerships for safety and quality

Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service

  • Dianne Leech, Director Quality Healthcare
  • Margaret Shapiro, Consumer Advisory Group Deputy Chair

A health literacy initiative that began with the Gold Coast Health Consumer Advisory Group (CAG) and led to a service wide health literacy partnership will be discussed. Our partnership and the health literacy journey we are undertaking is still in the early stage of establishing the partnership, reviewing health resources and potential health literacy ideas and practices both locally and internationally and building local networks. The nature and importance of the partnership, together with achievements to date will be discussed alongside consideration of the challenges ahead.

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Presentations Day 2

The power of consumer voices

telling our stories to tackle HIV infections among our communities

Queensland AIDS Council (QuAC)

  • Robert Muscolino, Health Promotion and Community Development
  • Tomas Montoya, Consumer Representative

Due to increasing rates of HIV within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD), men who have sex with men (MSM), and transgender populations, a creative, multi-targeted project was required to get vital health information to high risk populations. The #comeprepd Poster Project Phase II, features 15 posters/online stories to connect priority populations to information regarding pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a biomedical form of HIV prevention. The storytelling project promotes empowerment of consumers by sharing real life experiences, that contribute to the reduction of HIV and HIV related stigma. Seven consumers share their PrEP story to feature on posters/condom packs and various online platforms. Across four months, QuAC closely worked with community members to bring personal stories to life. Undertaking this project is expected to increase awareness of PrEP as an effective risk reduction strategy.

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Presentations Day 2

Transforming patient experiences through health literacy

Metro North Hospital and Health Service

  • Christine Petrie, Consumer Engagement Coordinator
  • Lisa Cox, Consumer Representative
  • Belinda Barrie, Consumer Representative

One of Metro North’s strategic objectives is to embed health literacy in service delivery. The rationale is that well-informed consumers who actively participate in decisions about their healthcare achieve better outcomes. A Health Literacy Project was initiated in February 2018 and from the beginning has engaged consumers, carers and the workforce. Underpinning all of our actions is the philosophy of health equity which is evident in the Metro North Health Literacy Approach. We will explore HOW we are engaging the workforce to partner with consumers, to become agents of change in transforming how healthcare is delivered. From a consumer perspective, we will answer WHY this is important. We will also explore how we have brought the relevant people together to collaborate, learn, share and improve when designing and implementing solutions relating to health literacy – including welcoming and preparing consumers; being active participants in decisions; enabling consumers to feel empowered, confident, in control and able to manage their health and wellbeing.

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Presentations Day 2

Challenging the status quo

Co-designing the future of child and youth mental health services with young people

Children’s Health Queensland, Child and Youth Mental Health Service

  • Leonie Sanderson, Senior Engagement Advisor, Health Consumers Queensland
  • Mikaela Moore, Consumer Representative

There is an ongoing development and co-design of a youth mental health peer worker program at Children’s Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service that delivers best practice mental health services for young people in Queensland. The project has utilised a participatory action research approach, a ground up methodology which was facilitated by Health Consumers Queensland, and has ensured that the lived experiences of consumers and carers have been an integral part of the project.

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Presentations Day 2

Yarning Circle

Strengthening Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voices

  • Diane Friday, Senior Aboriginal Health Worker, Community Health Ingham, Townsville Hospital and Health Service
  • Dallas Leon, Executive Director, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, Townsville Hospital and Health Service
  • Lyn Nichols, Cultural Capability Program Coordinator, Wide Bay Hospital and Health Service
  • Joy Savage, Executive Director, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health, Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service
  • Simon Costello, Senior Project Officer, Cultural Capability, Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service

The Yarning Circle is a name that has been given to the traditional Aboriginal process of sitting down and talking and listening to, and learning from, each other. It is a traditional practice that continues today with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The most important basic principle of Yarning is respectful listening. Respectful listening requires the listener to not formulate a response, verbally or mentally, until they have heard everything the speaker has to say. There is then a process, or series of steps, of being accountable for one’s response.

A Yarning Circle is about being responsible for what we say, being respectful to others when we have something to say and, being accountable for ensuring a safe Yarning Circle environment.

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